Tectonic Geomorphology of Mountains: A New Approach to Paleoseismology

Tectonic Geomorphology of Mountains: A New Approach to Paleoseismology


Yazar William B. Bull
Yayınevi Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN 9781405154796
Baskı yılı 2007
Sayfa sayısı 328
Ağırlık 0,88 kg
Stok durumu Tükendi   

With a balance of theory and practical applications, Tectonic Geomorphology of Mountains is essential reading for research geologists and upper-level undergraduate and graduate students in the earth sciences. * This book describes how tectonic events influence geomorphic processes and explores how landscapes respond to tectonic deformation in the ways in which they are weathered, washed, and abraded * Uses new approaches to enhance theoretical models of landscape evolution and to solve practical problems such as the assessment of earthquake hazards * Includes previously unpublished research and theory * Examines how to use key landforms as reference levels in changing landscapes, estimate rates of mountain-range uplift, and map seismic shaking caused by prehistorical earthquakes * Presents a diverse range of examples from around the world
Preface
1 Scrunch and Stretch Bedrock Uplift
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Pure Uplift, Stretch and Scrunch Bedrock Uplift 6
1.3 Landscape Responses to Regional Uplift 23
2 Concepts for Studies of Rising Mountains
2.1 Themes and Topics 27
2.2 The Fundamental Control of Base Level 28
2.3 Threshold of Critical Power in Streams 39
2.4 Equilibrium in Streams 42
2.5 Time Lags of Response 49
2.6 Tectonically-Induced Downcutting 58
2.7 Nontectonic Base-Level Fall and Strath Terrace Formation 66
2.8 Hydraulic Coordinates 69
3 Mountain Fronts
3.1 Introduction 75
3.2 Tectonically Active Escarpments 79
3.3 Fault Segmentation of Mountain Fronts 97
3.4 Summary 115
4 Tectonic Activity Classes of Mountain Fronts
4.1 Tectonic Setting of the North America-Pacific Plate Boundary 117
4.2 Appraisal of Regional Mountain Front Tectonic Activity 119
4.3 Summary 164
5 Fault Scarps
5.1 General Features 165
5.2 Scarp Morphology Changes with Time 172
5.3 Climatic Controls of Fault-Scarp Morphology 181
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