Organic Matter and Mineralisation: Thermal Alteration, Hydrocarbon Generation and Role in Metallogenesis

Organic Matter and Mineralisation: Thermal Alteration, Hydrocarbon Generation and Role in Metallogenesis


Yazar M. Glikson
Yayınevi Springer Netherlands
ISBN 9789048140190
Baskı yılı 2009
Sayfa sayısı 464
Stok durumu Tükendi   

A soft-rock petroleum-type approach to exploration for hard-rock minerals in sedimentary basins D. Taylor I. Introduction Several major groups of ore deposits are found as tabular, stratiform bodies or as cross- cutting but essentially stratabound deposits within sedimentary basins. Important exam- ples are oxide and carbonate ores of iron and manganese, copper and zinc-lead sulphides and gold-uranium deposits. Where the host basins have been strongly in- verted and deeply eroded and the mineralized horizons brought to outcrop, the laterally extensive nature of the mineralization usually results in outcrop or subcrop of the ore itself. Direct detection by geological or geochemical prospecting is then possible. Major deposits also occur in basins which have not been strongly deformed and deeply eroded as non-outcropping sub-horizontal sheets (Polish Kupferschiefer deposits of the fore-Sudetic Monocline) or linear belts (Vibumam Trend, Missouri, Admiral Bay, NW Australia). I believe that both the Polish Kupferschiefer and Admiral Bay de- posits were found by chance during oil and gas exploration, and deposits of this type are similar in attitude and dimensions to small-medium size oil and gasfields.
Introduction. Part I: Processes and Indicators in Organic-Metal Interaction. 1. Alteration and migration processes of organic matter in hydrothermal systems and implications for metallogenesis; B.R.T. Simoneit. 2. Paragenesis of gold- and hydrocarbon-bearing fluids in gold deposits; J. Parnell, A. McCready. 3. Trace elements and Sr isotope composition of waters from the Great Artesian Basin of Australia: Implications for the formation of ore deposits and hydrocarbon resources; M. Gasparon, K.D. Collerson. Part II: Proterozoic Organic / Metal Associations. 1. Nature of organic matter in the early Proterozoic, earliest life forms and metal associations; M. Glikson, D. Taylor. 2. Organic and mineral matter in a Precambrian Shungite deposit from Karelia, Russia; M. Mastalerz, et al. 3. Influence of basin fill architecture on fluid flow and ore genesis in the Mount Isa Basin, northern Australia; B. McConachie, et al. 4. Metallogenesis and hydrocarbon generation in northern Mount Isa Basin, Australia; implications for ore grade mineralization; M. Glikson, et al. Part III: Palaeozoic: Hydrothermal Systems and Sediment-Hosted Ore Bodies. 1. Volcanic and post-volcanic (hydrothermal) activity in an intra-Sudetic basin, SW Poland: Implications for mineralization; K. Mastalerz, M. Mastalerz. 2. Organic matter and metal enrichment in black shales of the Illinois Basin, U.S.A.; E. Ripley, N.R. Shaffer. 3. Organic matter from Zechstein copper deposits (Kupferschiefer) in Poland; Z. Sawlowicz, A.P. Gize. 4. Metalloporphyrin composition and a model for earlydiagenetic mineralization of the Permian Kupferschiefer, SW Poland; F. Czechowski. 5. The carbonate-hosted base-metal sulphide Polaris deposit in the Canadian Arctic: Organic matter alteration and clay diagenesis; Y. Heraux. 6. Nature and source of carbonate mineralisation in coals, Eastern Australia; S.D. Golding, et al. 7. Minerals in coal; J.D. Saxby. 8. Mineralisation in eastern Australian coals: A function of oil generation and primary migration; M. Glikson, et al. Part IV: Mesozoic -- Tertiary to Recent. 1. Implications of hydrocarbons in gold-bearing epithermal systems, selected examples from the Canadian Cordillera; M. Mastalerz, et al. 2. The association of gold-mercury mineralization and hydrocarbons in the coastal ranges of northern California; R. Sherlock. 3. Thermal history of selected sedimentary basins in an island: Evidence from organic matter and fluid inclusion; J. Aizawa. 4. Nano-bacteria, fiction or fact; P. Uwins, et al. Part V: Summary / Future Directions; M. Glikson, M. Mastalerz.